Winding wool – and the Dorothy Café…

Pam Smith, who used to live in Occupation Road, left a comment recently at ‘A Charny Family’ (https://cib2.wordpress.com/2013/09/24/a-charny-family/) asking if anyone had a photo of the wool shop on Charnwood Street. I wonder if this was the one called Wool-n-Wear at 173 Charnwood Street, where James Jelly previously had his funeral director’s business? It was still there in 1969, just before the street was demolished.

I don’t have a photograph, but a couple of people did remember a wool shop, maybe the same one, run by a Miss Seward, described as ‘thin and bespectacled’ with dark hair. Hand knitting was very popular at the time – and back into fashion again recently – but as some people will remember, the wool wasn’t always sold in a ball ready for knitting. A lot of it came as a ‘hank’, when it was wound into a large circular shape and then twisted on itself to keep it in place. It then had to be rolled into a ball, usually while someone else – often a child – held it either side around their hands. This wasn’t a popular job, but sometimes it was a way of getting some extra sweets…

Ruth Wragg remembers that her mother bought wool by the hank in Charnwood Street:

and you had to sit with your hands held up so she could roll it into a ball – but if you volunteered to do it for the wool lady she would give you either an aniseed ball, a gobstopper or a stick of liquorice wood or a sherbert flying saucer, which was my favourite.

Dorothy Café at 143 Charnwood Street.

Dorothy Café at 143 Charnwood Street (Michael Westmoreland)

Ruth’s mother kept the Dorothy Café at 143 Charnwood Street, to the left of Milner’s butcher’s in the photo above. Previous occupants of 143 included the Midland Diving Equipment Company, who appear there in a directory in 1960, and the boot repairer Fergus Wright, who was there from at least 1925 to 1954, maybe longer.

I think there were other cafes on Charnwood Street – someone mentioned one called the Venezia – but here’s an advert for the Dorothy suggesting the hard work that was involved in staying open for 14 hours a day, every day of the week…

Many thanks to Ruth for her memories and the advert, and to Michael Westmoreland for permission to reproduce the photograph of the café.

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3 thoughts on “Winding wool – and the Dorothy Café…

  1. I remember Miss? Seward’s shop very well in the early 60’s as my mother did a lot of knitting but wasn’t it on the left hand side as you went down the street from the Spinney Hill end – somewhere near Chaplins?
    The shop was lovely with all the hanks of wool and the brass ruler fixed to the counter.

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