More memories of Newby Street – houses and the chapel…

Here are some more of Mr Rowland Lord’s memories of Newby Street before the Second World War, including the house where he lived. There was one toilet between four houses, at the side of a chicken house: quite a ‘nerve-trying experience’, as he recalls, for an eight or nine year old in the dark in the winter. Newspaper squares hanging on string and a candle under a plant pot in the corner on the floor, ‘to help keep the frost at bay’, may bring back memories for some other people…

He also took part in activities at Newby Street Nonconformist Church, a Congregationalist church with its entrance on Humberstone Road and church rooms with a stage and balcony on Newby Street itself. These included drill competitions in the hall with the 9th Leicester Boys’ Brigade, and the anniversary days with 50 or 60 children singing on the stage, wearing new Sunday clothes for the occasion.

One woman who lived on Uppingham Road also remembered the Sunday School anniversaries at Newby Street as:

a very big feature which always took place in the Chapel in May. We always had new dresses and hats. I well remember one outfit I had for the occasion. It was a lilac dress, and I had a leghorn straw hat trimmed with sprays of lilac… After morning service, where we had sung… the rain pelted down… On arrival home, what a sad spectacle I looked! My lovely lilac silk dress was soaked, and the lilac flowers had weighted down the brim of the leghorn hat, which was now ruined with dye. My poor mother was aghast…*

She also recalled bazaars in December that lasted for three days and drew people from ‘near and far’ – with sideshows, and refreshments provided by the ladies of the church, after an official opening by ‘a notable Leicester person, with a view of donating a big cheque’.

The church started life nearby in a ‘small and inconvenient room’ in 1872, but soon outgrew this. In 1876 it became necessary to find ‘a permanent and more commodious home’, and after strenuous efforts by the Building Fund, the Memorial Stones of a new ‘substantial edifice’, capable of seating 750 people, were laid in July 1887 (Leicester Mercury, 26 October 2005).

The roof was damaged and became unsafe during the bombing of Frank Street in 1940, and it was later demolished and replaced by a new church at the bottom of Mere Road.

Thank you again to Mr Lord for sharing his memories.

*Jessie Carr, An Old Lady Remembers (Anderson Publications, 1986), p29

 

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